Labor Day on the Corwith Cramer!

Position:  43.1 N x 070.5 W, near Platts Bank, Gulf of Maine

Heading:  NW

Speed: 5 Knots

Weather: SSE winds, 15 knots

 

Williams-Mystic F11 enjoys Labor Day!

It’s Monday afternoon and we’re making great speed with the wind on our starboard quarter.  Everyone has their sea legs now and the Williams-Mystic F11 students not on watch are enjoying some time to draw, read, sing, and socialize.

For the past two days we have been sailing north.  Today we passed through Stellwagen National Marine Sanctuary and continued into the Gulf of Maine with finback whales at our side.

Every afternoon we have formal classes on deck.  Thus far, class topics have included maritime language, geologic formation of the Gulf of Maine, right of way at sea, and marlinspike seamanship.  Today we discussed territorial seas, marine sanctuaries, and had a line chase, where students showed their knowledge of the dozens of lines we use to adjust the sails from the deck.

Tonight, students begin work on their marine science projects.  Each student is in charge of presenting a subset of the data we have collected during the last week.  In addition to sampling the surface waters every hour, we completed three oceanographic Super Stations: on the continental shelf, the edge of the continental slope, and a submarine canyon. At our most distant station, we were nearly 100 miles offshore and collected water samples from 2000 meters below the surface (1.25 miles).

Dinner smells good!  We’ve been very well fed by our stewards and enjoy healthy, energizing meals through the days and nights.

Until next time from the SSV Corwith Cramer,

Lisa Gilbert, Chief Scientist

Zara (Williams) and Matt (Drexel) completing an oxygen titration in the lab, wearing the requisite funny hats.
B Watch students Gretchen (Smith), Zara (Williams), Charu (Mount Holyoke), Chris (Williams), Becky (Cal Maritime), and Matt (Drexel) learn to splice during class.

Author: williamsmystic

A one semester interdisciplinary ocean and coastal studies program integrating marine science, maritime history, environmental policy, and literature of the sea.

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