Making Friends (and also Cake)

Weird things happened with my email account this past week and so there is a delay in my posts. While I am currently living it up in Week 3 of the program I am going to flashback to the events of last week.

As I mentioned in my last post, I live in Albion House along with three other girls. There is Meghan (Smith ’18), Meaghan (UCONN ’19), and Meagan (Williams ’19). Totally kidding. Meagan is actually named Kristen, but she really is a sophomore at Williams College. They are great. Maybe I will feel differently about them in a week or two but so far I am happy to be in such a friendly and fairly clean house. To be fully honest, we do need to vacuum again. Four girls. Long hair. You get the picture.

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Celeste and her horse, Cupcake (2016); Meaghan Rondeau; Crayon on paper

 

 

For those of you reading this who are not alums, students, faculty, or staff, and therefore might not know how the housing works for the program, I will explain. The students are divided into four or five houses that are owned by the Seaport. All the houses are together so we can walk to and from one another’s house with ease. We shop for groceries with our houses and in Albion we eat together most nights. Albion has also taken to coloring in pictures of Disney princesses after dinner. We assume that the students who were here last semester left these coloring pages behind. Our goal is to diversify Disney. The drawings are questionable, but the process has definitely bonded us.

 

 

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Barbara leaving her Bat Mitzah (2016); Hannah Thomas; Crayon on paper

Every semester the students take four academic classes which are Maritime Literature, Marine Policy and Law, Maritime History, and then a science course. I am in Oceanography with about half of the students in the program while the other half is in Marine Ecology. In addition to the academic classes we also study a skill at the Seaport, mine is blacksmithing in the Ship Smith Shop. Additionally students are given the opportunity to work while in the program so I am working as the rigging loft assistant in the shipyard, while continuing to work my normal job in the interpretation department. Several students work on grounds, but others work as research assistants for professor or work in the offices. Some even write blog posts about the program.

So far all of the classes are pretty cool. I find Oceanography to be incredibly daunting as I am not much of a science student. My preferred science is political. Perhaps my reservations are rooted in the fact that my mother was my AP chemistry teacher in high school, and there were some road bumps.  That being said, all of the professors here are ridiculously nice and involved and so it is hard to dislike any subject. Not only do they teach our classes but they come with us on our field seminars and always seem to be happy to talk. Plus, at Williams-Mystic we get to do our own research projects, sail on a tall ship, and explore the local (and not local) history. I am trying not to geek out, but it is hard for me.

While I am not willing to say that I have a favorite class, I am comfortable admitting that my favorite tradition in the classroom takes place in Marine Policy and Law where, in an effort to break up the three hour seminar on Friday morning, we break at 10:30 for snack. Each week a house is assigned the task of bringing in a snack that is both delicious and relevant, meaning that we have to try to represent the cases we are discussing in that class, in food form. The assignments run alphabetically which means that my housemates and I were first. Our readings focused on public and private interests in coastal lands and waters. Naturally, we decided to make a sheet cake with a graham cracker house and a beach, clearly showing how private land extends to the high water mark. It was delicious. I am biased, but also, c’mon. Cake is cake.

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Cake aside, all of the classes have been pretty interesting. I say “pretty” because I am trying to have a laissez-faire vibe and not come across as a nerd who really likes going to class. On the first day of our literature class we got to listen to a live performance of sea music. In each history class we meet on Seaport grounds first and listen to a student lead presentation on a museum artifact. And of course we are exploring the local coastline in our science labs. Even in the classes where snack is not mandatory (and awesome), we are doing truly exciting things.

Speaking of exciting, F’16 completed a Williams-Mystic first this past weekend. A group of four students accompanied the ecology professor and the former director of the program to Long Island. The purpose of their journey was to study the recent mussel die-off. I was working so I missed this adventure, but two of my housemates, Meaghan and Meghan, went and had a wonderful time. They got lost, but they also got to ride on the ferry boats (Meaghan really likes ferries (and fairies)) and Mike, the ecology professor, bought breakfast and lunch. All good things. Jokes aside, my housemates said that it was a very interesting experience and ultimately a lot of fun.

Several of us definitely also watched Pirates of the Caribbean this weekend because we care about maritime history and inaccurate portrayals of pirates. Piratical misrepresentations aside, this week’s movie quote/piece of inspiration comes from that film because it is great, and because I think it applies to college students… sort of:

“One word, love: curiosity. You long for freedom. You long to do what you want to do because you want it. To act on selfish impulse. You want to see what it’s like. One day you won’t be able to resist.” – Jack Sparrow

All in all we are off to a great start, or at least that’s what Hannah of Week 2 thought. DUN DUN DUN!!!!

Author: williamsmystic

A one semester interdisciplinary ocean and coastal studies program integrating marine science, maritime history, environmental policy, and literature of the sea.

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